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In 1909, Michio Suzuki (1887–1982) founded the Suzuki Loom Works in the small seacoast village of Hamamatsu, Japan.
Business boomed as Suzuki built weaving looms for Japan's giant silk industry.

In 1929, Michio Suzuki invented a new type of weaving machine, which was exported overseas. The company's first 30 years focused on the development and production of these machines. 

Despite the success of his looms, Suzuki believed that his company would benefit from diversification and he began to look at other products.

Based on consumer demand, he decided that building a small car would be the most practical new venture.

The project began in 1937, and within two years Suzuki had completed several compact prototype cars.

These first Suzuki motor vehicles were powered by a then-innovative, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, four-cylinder engine. It had a cast aluminum crankcase and gearbox and generated 13 horsepower (9.7 kW) from a displacement of less than 800cc.

After the war, the Japanese had a great need for affordable, reliable personal transportation.

A number of firms began offering "clip-on" gas-powered engines that could be attached to the typical bicycle.

Suzuki's first two-wheeled vehicle was a bicycle fitted with a motor called, the "Power Free." Designed to be inexpensive and simple to build and maintain, the 1952 Power Free had a 36 cc, one horsepower, two-stroke engine.

The new double-sprocket gear system enabled the rider to either pedal with the engine assisting, pedal without engine assist, or simply disconnect the pedals and run on engine power alone.

By 1954, Suzuki was producing 6,000 motorcycles per month and had officially changed its name to Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd. Following the success of its first motorcycles


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